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Some inmates in California could begin getting certain limited health services, including substance abuse treatment and mental health diagnoses, using Medicaid funds.

Typically, inmates lose Medicaid coverage while in the prison, jail or juvenile justice system.

This change will be the first time ever that Medicaid has provided some coverage for inmates, the Associated Press

Adults who live in rural areas, and Black men in particular, are at much higher risk for developing heart failure.

Heart failure is a chronic, progressive condition that develops when the heart fails to pump enough blood for the body’s needs.

Researchers from the U.S. National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., an...

MONDAY, Jan. 23, 2023 (HealthDay News) – “Pharma bro” Martin Shkreli may have violated a judge’s order banning him from being involved in the pharmaceutical industry, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission announced Friday.

Shkreli, who was convicted for an illegal scheme to maintain a monopoly on the lifesaving toxoplasmosis drug Daraprim, could now be held in contempt of court for fo...

Hundreds of rural hospitals across the United States are teetering on the edge of closure, with their financial status increasingly in peril, a new report reveals.

More than 200 rural hospitals are at immediate risk of closure because they aren’t making enough money to cover the rising cost of providing care, and their low financial reserves leave them little margin for error,

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 16, 2023
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  • American adults who have epilepsy and are Black or Hispanic are less likely than white adults to be prescribed the latest medications, according to new research.

    “While finding the right medication is often a trial-and-error process that is based on the individual, studies have shown that use of newer medications improves outcomes, and some newer medications have fewer side effects,” ...

    Millions of Americans are about to lose Medicaid coverage that they gained — and maintained hassle-free — through the pandemic.

    The end-of-year spending bill that Congress passed will “unwind” a continuous Medicaid enrollment requirement that states had to honor to get additional federal pandemic funds, explained

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 4, 2023
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  • Most working-age Americans get health insurance through their employer, but even they are finding it tougher to afford medical care these days, a new study shows.

    Researchers found that over the past 20 years, a growing number of Americans with job-based health insurance have been skipping medical care due to costs. Women have been particularly hard-hit.

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 29, 2022
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  • Insured Black patients are less likely to undergo minimally invasive heart valve replacement or repairs -- relatively safe procedures -- than their white counterparts, new research shows.

    Black patients who need a mitral valve replacement are more likely to have operations that involve opening the chest and cutting through the breastbone to reveal the heart, a

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 28, 2022
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  • It's a scenario no parent would ever want to witness: Their child suffers a mental health crisis and is taken to the emergency room, only to have to wait 12 hours or more for the right medical care.

    Sadly, it is what 1 in 5 of these young patients now face, new research finds.

    "For kids with mental health conditions, long waits in the emergency department have been a compounding pr...

    Many Asian American and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander adults may have trouble accessing health care and insurance because of language barriers, a new analysis indicates.

    In a new repor...

    The color of his skin and where he lives may influence an American man's odds of dying from prostate cancer, a new study reveals.

    Black men and men living in the Western United States face the most dire prognosis, American Cancer Society (ACS) researchers report.

    "Why prostate cancer mortality is so high in the Western region, including California, despite lower incidence rates over...

    Homeless people in California's largest county are more than twice as likely to die from COVID-19 as the general population, a new study finds.

    Researchers from the county, UCLA and the University of Southern California found that homeless people in Los Angeles County who contracted the virus were 2.35 times more likely to die, suggesting that homelessness is a unique risk factor for...

    Young adults with cancer, especially those who are Hispanic or Black, had better outcomes because of coverage available to them under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

    New research explored the impact of Medicaid coverage under the ACA, also known as Obamacare, linking it to with better survival for 18- to 39-ye...

    The prices that health insurers agree to pay for joint replacement surgery vary widely and are unrelated to conventional measures of the quality of care.

    That's the conclusion of a new study that found who is footing the bill is the biggest influence on the price tag.

    Total joint replacements (TJR) — especially of knees and hips — are the most common in-hospital surgeries for U....

    For many years, Plan B One-Step and it generic equivalents — collectively known as “morning after” pills to prevent a pregnancy -- included information in packaging that suggested that the pill might work by interrupting the implantation of a fertilized egg into the womb.

    There was, however, no scientific evidence that that was the case, experts have long contended.

    With the ...

    When rural hospitals shut down people need to go elsewhere, and a new study finds that nearby hospitals bear the strain of that patient overflow.

    "Previous studies have shown that rural hospital closures can have negative health consequences for the communities they serve," said researcher Daniel George, an associate p...

    Many American women have to travel long distances to reach the nearest mammography center, a new study finds -- raising questions about whether that keeps some from receiving breast cancer screening.

    Researchers found that 8.2 million women had limited access to mammography screening in 2022 -- defined as living more than a 20-minute drive to the nearest facility. That was up from 7.5 mil...

    In U.S. states with more restrictive abortion policies, rates of pregnant women, new mothers and infants dying were higher, a new report finds.

    The analysis, conducted by the Commonwealth Fund, found that states with heavily restricted...

    Insulin pumps can help folks with type 1 diabetes get better control of their disease and minimize how often they inject insulin, and use of the devices has taken off in the past 20 years.

    That's the good news from a new study.

    The not-so-great news is that a large gap in wh...

    Black patients are more likely than their white peers to need emergency surgery for colon cancer, which increases their risk for complications and death, study authors say.

    "Overall, these results suggest that racial and ethnic differences persist" among colon cancer patients, and "these differences likely contribute to disparities in postoperative outcomes among these groups," said firs...

    If someone is stricken with a blood cancer or life-threatening clot, they'll probably fare better if they are white and wealthy, three new studies show.

    The ongoing impact of patient race and income to medical outcomes was in the spotlight Saturday in New Orleans at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH).

    In one study, a team led by

  • Ernie Mundell HealthDay Reporter
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  • December 12, 2022
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  • Black patients with brain tumors may be less likely to have surgery recommended to them than white patients are, according to a large U.S. study.

    The research, which looked at two national databases, found that on average, Black patients were less likely to have surgery recommended for any of four types of brain tumor. That included three considered benign (non-cancerous) and one that is ...

    Doctors give men and women different advice to head off heart disease, even though guidelines for both are the same.

    Men were 20% more likely to be prescribed statins to lower blood levels of bad cholesterol compared with women, a new study found.

    Women, meanwhile, were 27% more likely to be advised to lose weight or reduce their salt intake, and 38% more likely to receive recommen...

    Costs for epilepsy medications in the United States are skyrocketing, outpacing inflation and straining federal insurers Medicare and Medicaid, according to new research.

    Spending on antiseizure medications more than doubled in eight years for the government insurers, largely because of third-generation and brand-name drugs, the study found.

    "While it's very important that Medicare ...

    The United States will renew its focus on ending the HIV/AIDS epidemic by 2030, with new funding and a five-year strategy, the White House said Thursday.

    The Biden administration announced its ambitious p...

    The nationwide shortage of health care professionals -- a so-called "Great Resignation" of providers -- is impacting patient care in ways large and small, a new HealthDay/Harris Poll shows.

    One in four Americans (25%) have noticed or personally experienced the impact of staffing shortages in health care, second only to staff shortages in the retail sector (35%), the poll found.

    Black adults who undergo a common procedure to open up clogged arteries are readmitted to the hospital more often than their white peers. They're also more likely to die in the years after treatment, a new study finds.

    Researchers looked at how patients fared following balloon angioplasty and coronary stenting -- "one of the most common cardiovascular procedures performed in the U.S....

    People with one form of the genetic blood disorder hemophilia now have a one-time treatment with a $3.5 million price tag.

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the new gene therapy Hemgenix on Nov. 22. Soon after, drugmaker CSL Behring revealed its cost.

    The company said its drug would ultimately reduce health care costs because patients with the genetic disorder would ne...

    Blood levels of HDL, the famously "good" kind of cholesterol, may not make a big difference to heart health after all -- particularly for Black people, a large new study suggests.

    The study, of nearly 24,000 U.S. adults, found that low HDL levels were tied to a somewhat higher risk of heart attack among white people. That was not the case for Black adults, however.

    Meanwhile, high H...

    Whether you survive a bout with cancer may depend, in part, on where you live.

    Researchers at the American Cancer Society and Clemson University in South Carolina found a 20% higher death rate for all cancer types in the communities with the most racial and economic segregation.

    For lung cancer, the death rate was 50% higher in the most segregated counties.

    "Many people livin...

    California's plan to manufacture its own insulin could be a huge money-saver for state residents with diabetes -- and possibly be a model for other states, according to experts.

    Earlier this year, California announced an initiative to bring its own insulin products to market, in response to the steep costs of the lifesaving drug in the United States.

    And if it's successful, it will ...

    A growing number of U.S. teenagers are undergoing weight-loss surgery, but the figures suggest many still lack access to the procedures -- especially underinsured Black and Hispanic kids.

    That's the conclusion of a new study charting trends in bariatric (weight-loss) surgery among U.S. teens. Researchers found that between 2010 and 2017, the annual rate of the procedures doubled among kid...

    In a finding that challenges the notion that immigrants are freeloaders in the American health care system, a new study shows they are paying a lot more through health care premiums and related taxes than they actually use in care.

    In fact, the amount that immigrants pay in makes up for some of the amount of health care that non-immigrants use in excess of what they pay.

    “Some p...

    Telemedicine became widespread during the pandemic, and that may have shifted patient views about using technology as way to communicate with their doctors, a new study suggests.

    Certain groups, including Black patients and those with lower education levels, became especially more apt to use it.

    "Our findings suggest that more Americans are becoming comfortable with telehealth and u...

    Although blood pressure levels among Americans rose during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research suggests things could have been far worse.

    "We expected blood pressure control to be worse due to decreased physical activity, stress, poor sleep and other cardiovascular disease risk factors that worsened during the pandemic," said study leader

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • November 3, 2022
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  • Black and Hispanic patients are less likely to be given antiviral drugs such as Paxlovid to help battle a bout of COVID-19 than white patients are, a new government report shows.

    In a st...

    When someone collapses in front of witnesses, the chances of receiving potentially lifesaving CPR may partly depend on the color of their skin, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that when Black and Hispanic Americans suffer cardiac arrest, they are up to 37% less likely than white people to receive bystander CPR in public places and at home.

    The reasons for the disparity are ...

    When a man has cancer in an area that affects sexual function, his doctor is likely to discuss it with him.

    But the same is not true for a woman who has cancer in a sex organ, according to new research. Investigators found 9 in 10 men were asked about their sexual health, yet only 1 in 10 women received the same care.

    "There seems to be a big disparity in the way we approach sexual...

    A person with advanced heart failure may often need a heart transplant or a mechanical heart pump to survive.

    But white patients are twice as likely as Black patients to get this critically important care, a new study finds, and racial bias may be the reason why.

    Dental coverage under Medicare could soon start expanding for seniors under a new proposal from the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

    Still, the proposed rules would not provide full coverage for regular dental care, which has been explicitly excluded from Medicare since...

    More than 1 million Americans with diabetes have to ration lifesaving insulin because they can't afford it, a new study shows.

    Many people delayed picking up their insulin prescription, while others took lower doses than they needed, researchers found.

    Exp...

    While a large number of Hispanic Americans have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine at this point, a new study suggests barriers may still stand in the way for those who might want to get shots.

    Researchers identified four key barriers to vaccination: a...

    Telehealth became a common way for doctors to see patients during the early days of the pandemic.

    New research suggests that surgical patients offered virtual care are far more likely to keep appointments before and after their operation than those who rely on in-per...

    Pregnancy can be safer and healthier for both mom and baby with good access to quality maternity care.

    Yet, the United States is still among one of the most dangerous developed nations for childbirth, especially in rural areas and communities of color, according to a new March of Dimes repo...

    Breast cancer researchers and clinicians have made tremendous progress in reducing death rates in the past three decades, yet a racial gap persists in the United States.

    Even with the lower numbers of actual disease compared to white patients, Black women are still much more likely to die from the disease.

    The American Cancer Society highlights these disparities in a new report.

    The U.S. government will invest $266 million to shore up the community and public health workforce using American Rescue Plan funding.

    About $225.5 million will go to 83 recipients to support training and apprenticeship for 13,000 new community health workers, CNN reported before Friday's announcement...

    Many Americans with heart disease also have limited access to food, and this dangerous combination is growing rapidly, a new study finds.

    "Food insecurity is a common problem...

    Five years back, “Nugget” the Jack-A-Poo was in serious need of some tender loving veterinary care.

    “He needed vaccinations and a few other things,” Seattle native Grace Stroklund recalled of her sidekick, a Jack Russell Terrier/Toy Poodle mix. “But I was just not in the wheelhouse financially to do any of that.”

    At 23, Stroklund was struggling with her own challenges. H...

    Here's another reason to stay out of jail: New research shows the risk of dying from cancer is sharply higher among those who are behind bars or have been recently released.

    In Connecticut prisons, where the data for this study were gathered, the average age for a cancer diagnosis was 5...

    Weeks after a stay in the hospital, your bill arrives and you can barely believe the amount due. How is this even possible if you have good health insurance and, more importantly, how will you pay it?

    Unfortunately, you're not alone. More than one in 10 American adults and nearly one in five U.S. households have

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 19, 2022
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