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19 May

HealthDay Now: Maternal Mortality Crisis Hits Black Mothers Hardest

HealthDay’s Mabel Jong will be joined by Stacey D. Stewart, the president & CEO of March of Dimes, and Dr. Chereena Walker, a hospitalist and mother of two from Missouri who experienced severe complications during her pregnancies. Stewart and Walker will discuss the risks that pregnant women — particularly women of color — face in the United States.

Health News Results - 450

Black adults who undergo a common procedure to open up clogged arteries are readmitted to the hospital more often than their white peers. They're also more likely to die in the years after treatment, a new study finds.

Researchers looked at how patients fared following balloon angioplasty and coronary stenting -- "one of the most common cardiovascular procedures performed in the U.S....

MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Blood levels of HDL, the famously "good" kind of cholesterol, may not make a big difference to heart health after all -- particularly for Black people, a large new study suggests.

The study, of nearly 24,000 U.S. adults, found that low HDL levels were tied to a somewhat higher risk of heart attack among white people. That was no...

Whether you survive a bout with cancer may depend, in part, on where you live.

Researchers at the American Cancer Society and Clemson University in South Carolina found a 20% higher death rate for all cancer types in the communities with the most racial and economic segregation.

For lung cancer, the death rate was 50% higher in the most segregated counties.

"Many people livin...

In a finding that illustrates just how deeply racial disparities permeate the U.S. health care system, a new government report finds that suicide rates dipped slightly among white Americans while they rose for Black and Hispanic Americans.

"Although the recent decline in suicide rates for non-Hispanic whi...

U.S. stillbirth rates still need to be tackled at the local, state and national levels because efforts to reduce the risk have stalled, new research claims.

Racial disparities remain as well, with Black women more likely to experience stillbirth (the loss of a baby before or during delivery) than white women.

"Over the last 40 years, we have reduced certain risk factors for stillbi...

Extracurricular activities may have many benefits for young children, but researchers have discovered racial gaps in who takes part.

Among a group of 401 kindergarten students in Ohio, white children were 2.6 times more likely to participate in the most common extracurricular sports than children of other races and ethnicities.

The study found similar results for other after-school...

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2022 (HealthDay News) – Too little of the "sunshine vitamin" -- vitamin D -- in Black Americans could raise their odds of developing diabetes, new research suggests.

Two new studies found an association between levels of vitamin D in the blood and insulin resistance, a pre...

A new study has shown the blood pressure drug telmisartan may offer new hope as an Alzheimer's treatment in Black patients. It did not show the same benefit in white people.

Learning how people from different ethnic groups respond to the same drug could be key in the fight against Alzheimer's disease, researchers say. Even though Black people are more likely than white folks to develop th...

Faulty readings by pulse oximeters may have resulted in more COVID deaths among minorities, doctors warned in testimony before a U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel this week.

Pulse oximeters are small devices that read a person’s blood oxygen levels via a fingertip. During the pandemic, health workers used the readings to help determine who should receive scarce medicatio...

TUESDAY, Nov. 1, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Discrimination doesn’t just cause emotional pain in the moment, it may affect a victim's physical recovery from a heart attack, new research suggests.

In studying more than 2,600 heart attack survivors between the ages of 18 and 55, researchers found that those reporting more perceived discrimination were more likely to have p...

FRIDAY, Oct. 28, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Black and Hispanic patients are less likely to be given antiviral drugs such as Paxlovid to help battle a bout of COVID-19 than white patients are, a new government report shows.

In a

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 28, 2022
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  • THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- An often-deadly type of stroke -- subarachnoid hemorrhage -- is on the upswing in the United States, particularly among Black people, new research shows.

    Unlike the more common ischemic stroke, subarachnoid hemorrha...

    THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- When someone collapses in front of witnesses, the chances of receiving potentially lifesaving CPR may partly depend on the color of their skin, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that when Black and Hispanic Americans suffer cardiac arrest, they are up to 37% less likely than white people to receive bystander CPR in publi...

    A Missouri woman has sued L’Oréal and several other beauty product companies, alleging that their hair-straightening products caused her uterine cancer.

    The

    MONDAY, Oct. 24, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- One in 10 older Americans has dementia, and twice as many have mild mental impairment, a new study finds.

    As the nation's population grows older, the burden on families and society is likely to grow, and minorities will be affected most, experts say.

    "As the population in the U.S. ages, it is projected that there will be m...

    Women who regularly use chemical hair straighteners may be more prone to developing uterine cancer, a new large government study suggests.

    The study, which followed nearly 34,000 U.S. women over a decade, found that those who frequently used hair straighteners were 2.5 times more likely to de...

    A person with advanced heart failure may often need a heart transplant or a mechanical heart pump to survive.

    But white patients are twice as likely as Black patients to get this critically important care, a new study finds, and racial bias may be the reason why.

    It's well known that Black women in the United States have an increased risk of childbirth complications. Now, a large new study finds even larger racial disparities when women conceive through infertility treatments.

    Researchers found that among U.S. women who'd undergone various

    It's a troubling equation: Many Americans with the highest rates of hospitalization for influenza have the lowest uptake of the annual flu vaccine.

    That's why the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is stepping up outreach to minority communities, including Black, Hispanic and American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) groups, and working to reduce barriers to vaccination.

    ...

    Over time, men and women under chronic stress face a significantly higher risk that they will die as a result of cancer, a new study warns.

    The finding comes from an analysis of more than three decades of U.S. data from a federal health and nutrition survey.

    After adjusting f...

    Breast cancer researchers and clinicians have made tremendous progress in reducing death rates in the past three decades, yet a racial gap persists in the United States.

    Even with the lower numbers of actual disease compared to white patients, Black women are still much more likely to die from the disease.

    The American Cancer Society highlights these disparities in a new report.

    While certain minority groups are more likely to be diagnosed with dementia than their white counterparts, they may also be less likely to be eligible for new disease-slowing treatments, a new study finds.

    Cognitive, or mental, impairment in Black, Hispanic and Asian patients is more likely to be caused by forms of dementia unrelated to the

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • October 4, 2022
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  • Larry Griner resigned from his job in California and moved back to his childhood home in Baltimore nearly five years ago so he could care for his mother, Norma.

    She had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease almost 12 y...

    Places of worship may provide respite for Black men that not only enhances their lives, but may extend them, new research suggests.

    "Black men have been oppressed, commodified, surveilled and criminalized like no other group in U.S. history and they often experience disproportionately high levels of social and psychological stress from

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 30, 2022
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  • Monkeypox cases continue to fall in the United States, but public health officials now are concerned that the virus is wending its way into communities of color.

    New case numbers are down by nearly half since early August, White House monkeypox response coordinator Bob Fenton said in a Thursday media briefing....

    Chad Gradney underwent quadruple bypass open-heart surgery at age 27, and afterward spent eight fruitless years battling extremely high cholesterol levels.

    Then in 2012 he found himself back in an emergency room, again suffering from chest pain.

    "That's when I found out three of the four bypasses basically had failed again," recalls Gradney, now 44 and living in Baton Rouge, La.

    ...

    Thermometers that read body temperature via the forehead have become a common sight throughout the pandemic, but whether they always spot a fever may depend on the color of someone's skin.

    In a new study, researchers found that, similar to problems seen with

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 8, 2022
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  • Surgery for uterine fibroids can often be done through minimally invasive techniques that avoid a hospital stay. But Black and Hispanic women may be less likely to receive these treatments, a recent study finds.

    Uterine fibroids are non-cancerous growths in the uterus. Sometimes they cause no probl...

    A network that receives and supplies blood for transfusions nationwide is calling for more diverse blood donors.

    Less than 20% of blood donations are from people of color, but those donations are essential. Frequently transfused patients often require blood from donors with similar ethnic and racial backgrounds.

    Those who need frequent transfusions include people with

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • September 6, 2022
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  • Although there's now enough monkeypox vaccine to go around, the Americans who need it most still may not be getting it, a new report shows.

    Only 10% of the Jynneos vaccine doses have been

  • By Steven Reinberg and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • August 29, 2022
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  • Gen Zers and millennials are about twice as likely to develop high blood pressure during pregnancy than women from the baby boom generation were, a new study finds. This includes conditions such as preeclampsia and gestational hypertension.

    It's usually believed that the odds of developing high blood pressure during pregnancy rise with the age of the mother, but after taking age into acco...

    It's well known that exposure to lead can harm young children's brain development. Now a new study suggests that racial segregation may be compounding the detrimental effects of lead on Black children.

    The study, of close to 26,000 schoolchildren, found that Black children with elevated blood lead levels had wo...

    Staffing shortages at nursing homes across the United States are severe in disadvantaged areas where needs may be greatest, researchers say.

    The study — recently published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society — looked at staffing before the COVID-19 pandemic. It f...

    U.S. workers without paid leave lost out on an estimated $28 billion in wages during the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new report.

    The analysis showed that the greatest increases in unpaid absences were among low-income workers who were self-employed,...

    Numerous studies have found discrimination can hurt aspects of human health.

    Now, new research adds to that the impact of discrimination on the youngest humans by linking discrimination with a heightened risk of underweight and premature infants.

    Maternal death rates amo...

    Babies who are white appear to get diagnostic appointments for cystic fibrosis earlier than babies of several other races and ethnicities, new research shows.

    This can cause gaps in care and outcomes.

    While it is recommended that infants who have an initial positive screening for cystic fibrosis be furt...

    When they suffer a heart attack, Black and Hispanic patients in the United States receive subpar care compared with white patients, new research reveals.

    The study of more than 87,000 insured heart attack patients found that Blac...

    Black and Hispanic Americans are more likely than others to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, and new research suggests that racism is a contributor.

    Experiences of structural, interpersonal and institutional

    Black patients should start screening early for glaucoma, because they have a high risk of vision loss caused by elevated pressure levels inside the eye, researchers say.

    A team from New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai found that African heritage was an independent risk factor for

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 26, 2022
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  • Black residents in U.S. nursing homes are much more likely than white residents to be repeatedly transferred to hospital care, a new study reports.

    Black nursing home residents are likely to be transferred to the hospital and back at least four times in a given year, according to data gathered under a U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid quality improvement initiative.

    So are nurs...

    The most common test of lung function, spirometry, probably is not detecting signs of emphysema in some people with the lung ailment, a new study says.

    In particular, Black men are at greater risk of suffering from undiagnosed emphysema, since the way spirometry results are interpreted ap...

    Medical schools are doing a better job of recruiting minority students, but they still struggle to keep those would-be doctors on...

    Every town wants low crime rates. But a new finding may offer a whole new reason to advocate for the change: Falling crime rates may lower heart disease fatalities.

    An analysis of 2000-2014 data from Chicago illustrated a significant decline in violent crime. Across the city, the drop in total crime was 16%, while simultaneously there was a 13% decrease in

  • By Ellie Quinlan Houghtaling HealthDay Reporter
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  • July 18, 2022
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  • Early in the pandemic, scores of Americans bought pulse oximeters to help determine how sick they were while infected with COVID-19, but new research finds the devices often miss dangerously low blood oxygen levels in Black veterans.

    This is not the first time such inaccuracies...

    Getting a blood cancer diagnosis is devastating for young people, but it is also far more deadly if the patient is Black, new research shows.

    The new study, which looked at outcomes for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), highlights an urgent need to understand racial and ethn...

    Vitamin D, the "Sunshine Vitamin," boosts the immune system and helps prevent cancer, among other health benefits, but a significant number of Black and Hispanic teens have low levels of this nutrient, according to a new study.

    "This paper calls attention to the need to raise...

    Even though Black people may be more likely to live near a hospital with a certified stroke center, those who need the specialty care are still more likely to receive it at a hospital with fewer resources.

    And this can hurt the...

    Women of color may face delays in getting a biopsy after a screening mammogram suggests they might have breast cancer, a large, new study finds.

    Researchers found that compared with white women, Asian, Black and Hispanic women were all more likely to wait over a month ...

    Americans' life expectancy varies widely -- based not only on race, but where in the country they live.

    That's one of the overarching messages from a new study that looked, state by state, at Americans' life expectancy at birth. It found that between 1990 and 2019,

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • June 28, 2022
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  • Deep-rooted bias may affect the way white patients physically respond to medical care provided by physicians of differing race or gender.

    Researchers assessed treatment reactions of nearly 200 white patients after they were randomly assigned to receive care from a male or female doctor who was either Black, white or Asian.

    White patients appeared to improve faster when treated by a...

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