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Results for search "Exercise: Misc.".

Health News Results - 628

For decades, Todd Vogt has been dedicated to the sport of rowing, believing he was in peak physical condition. Then, a series of symptoms began to emerge, turning his life upside down.

"My left arm stopped swinging, and I felt incredibly fatigued," Vogt, 49, recalled. "Eventually,...

Some folks like to count their daily steps, while others prefer exercising for a certain amount of time during a day or a week.

Luckily, either approach boosts health, a new study finds.

Exercise targets based on either step count or minutes are equally associated with lowe...

Athletes who push themselves to maximum performance don’t appear to pay a price when it comes to their longevity, a new study says.

The first 200 athletes to run a mile in under four minutes actually outlived the general population by nearly five years on ...

Children and young adults who are couch potatoes could wind up with enlarged hearts, increasing their risk of heart attack, stroke and early death.

Sedentary behavior contributed as much as 40% to the total increase in heart size between the ages of 17 and 24, researchers found.

Further,...

The benefits of physical fitness for kids spill over into their mental health, new research shows.

Getting plenty of exercise may guard against depressive symptoms, anxiety and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a new study published April 29 in the journal J...

Doctors argue that genetics aren’t destiny when it comes to a person’s health, and a study appears to support that notion.

A healthy lifestyle can offset the effects of life-shortening genes by more than 60%, researchers found.

People at high genetic risk of a curtailed lifespan could extend their life expectancy by nearly 5.5 years if they’ve adopted a healthy lifestyle by ag...

Want to live longer? Choose the stairs over the elevator, a new review suggests.

Folks who regularly climb stairs have a 24% reduced risk of dying from any cause, and a 39% reduced risk of dying from heart disease, compared to those who always take the eleva...

Active women using the pill appear to receive an added bonus from their birth control, a new study says.

These women are less likely to suffer sprains and strains than women not on birth control, researchers reported recently in the journal Medicine & Science...

Walking is one of the best exercises available to average folks, and it can be as easy as stepping out your front door, experts say.

“It is something you can easily fit into your lifestyle,” said Dr. James McDeavitt, professor of physical medicine and rehabilitation and executive vice president and dean of clinical ...

You know exercise is great for your cardiovascular health, but new research suggests that your brain has a lot to do with it.

It's all about physical activity's ability to lower stress levels within the brain, explained a team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in Boston.

Bolstering that finding, their study found that exercise brought the greatest heart benefits to peop...

People with Long COVID might be able to exercise to improve their health, something that up to now has been discouraged, a new study suggests.

“The World Health Organization [WHO] and other major bodies have said that people with post-COVID should avoid intense exercise,” said lead researcher

Desks that require folks to stand or move as they work also might help them produce better results on the job, a new study suggests.

People's brains became sharper when working at a desk that made them stand, step or walk rather than sit, results show.

Reasoning scores in particular improved when at an active workstation, researchers said.

“It is feasible to blend movement w...

Seniors wound up with lower blood pressure after they were coached to get up and move more often, a new study says.

Health coaching successfully reduced sitting time for a group of older adults by just over 30 minutes a day, according to a report published March 27 in the journal JAMA Network Open<...

Some folks struggling with obesity appear to be hampered by their own genes when it comes to working off those extra pounds, a new study finds.

People with a higher genetic risk of obesity have to exercise more to avoid becoming unhealthily heavy, researchers discovered.

�...

The weight room is becoming an increasingly dangerous place for folks trying to get into shape, a new study discovers.

Head and facial injuries related to weightlifting have increased sharply during the past decade for both men and women, researchers found.

Between 2013 and 2022, the annual rate of exercise- and weightlifting-related

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 22, 2024
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  • If you're in your 60s, 70s or even older, you might think your days of productively pumping iron are behind you.

    That's just not true, said Dr. Adil Ahmed, an assistant professor in the Joseph Barnhart Department of Orthopedic Surgery at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

    Building and maintaining muscle is ...

    Athletes whose coaches are open, authentic and positive are more likely to have better mental health, a new study says.

    Athletes feel happier and deal with problems more easily if their coaches adopt an “authentic leadership” style, researchers report in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 7, 2024
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  • Even a little physical activity can cut a person's stroke risk compared to being a complete couch potato, a new review shows.

    Folks whose physical activity levels fell short of recommended guidelines still had a lower risk of stroke than those who got no exercise, researchers report.

    Compared with no exercise, the highest “ideal” amount of physical activity cut stroke risk by 29...

    A bicycle built for two could be a positive prescription for Parkinson's patients and their caregivers, a small, preliminary study says.

    Parkinson's patients had better overall quality of life, improved mobility, and faster walking speed after sharing regular rides on a stationary tandem bike with a care partner, researchers plan to report at the annual meeting of the American Academy of ...

    In a new study, yoga appears to have bolstered the brain health of older women who had risk factors for Alzheimer's disease.

    The study can't prove that the ancient practice will slow or prevent the onset of Alzheimer's, but it did seem to reverse some forms of neurological decline, researchers said.

    “That is what yoga is good for -- to reduce stress, to improve brain health, subje...

    Regular standing and walking activities in the classroom can aid in the fight against childhood obesity, a new study shows.

    Children who took part in the Active Movement program experienced an 8% reduction in their waist-to-height ratio, according to results from British primary schools.

    Participation in sports also increased by 10...

    Women might need a lot fewer daily steps to lower their risk of heart failure than they think, a new study suggests.

    The usual recommendation is that people get 10,000 steps a day, but women ages 63 and older actually gain solid heart benefits from around 3,600 steps daily, researchers report Fev. 21 in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 26, 2024
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  • Junk food increases people's risk of colon cancer, as well as alcohol, lack of exercise and obesity.

    Unfortunately, many Americans don't know about these risk factors for colon cancer, a new survey has found.

    Colon and rectal cancers have been rising in people under 50 for two decades, researchers said, meaning that many develop the cancer before screening colonoscopies are recommen...

    An open question for weight-loss drugs like Ozempic, Wegovy and Zepbound has been whether folks will keep the pounds off when they stop taking them.

    Regular exercise could be the key to quitting the drugs without regaining weight, a new Danish study says.

    “It is actually possible to stop taking the medication without large weight regain, if you follow a structured exercise regime,...

    Folks can lose weight even if they pack all their weekly exercise into one or two days, a new study finds.

    Guidelines recommend that people get at least 150 minutes a week of moderate physical activity or 75 minutes a week of vigorous exercise.

    “Weekend warriors” who condense all that exercise into one or two days each week can lose about the same amount of weight as people who ...

    There's good news for females who think that men shed pounds faster than women do: New research shows women get more health benefits from exercise than men, even if they put in less effort.

    When exercising regularly, women's risk of an early death or fatal heart event drops more than that of men who work out, researchers found.

    Over two decades, physically active women were 24% less...

    THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2024 (Health Day News) -- Schools that want little girls to get plenty of exercise might want to rethink their dress code.

    A University of Cambridge study of more than 1 million kids in 135 countries found that in countries where most students wear school uniforms, fewer kids get the 60 minutes a day of physical activity recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO...

    Folks who get regular exercise are less likely to become infected with COVID or develop a severe case requiring a hospital stay, a new study finds.

    Compared to couch potatoes, adults who adhere to U.S. physical activity guidelines have 10% lower odds of COVID infection and 27% lower odds of hospitalization from it, results in

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 14, 2024
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  • Pickleball has become the darling of older folks trying to stay in shape, but new research shows that with that popularity has come a surge in serious injuries.

    Bone fractures related to pickleball have increased 90-fold over the last 20 years, with most injuries occurring in adults ages 60 to 69, finds a new analysis presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Or...

    Don't expect to sweat away the heart risks posed by sugary sodas and drinks, a new study warns.

    Canadian researchers found that even if the recommended 150 minutes of weekly physical activity protects against cardiovascular disease, it's not enough to counter the adverse effects of sugar-sweetened beverages.

    “Physical activity reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease associated ...

    Being active may help ease ongoing cancer pain.

    That's the key takeaway from a study of more 10,600 people with a history of cancer and over 51,000 without the disease.

    A team led by Erika Rees-Punia of the American Cancer Society and

  • Carole Tanzer Miller HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 12, 2024
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  • New research suggests healthy lifestyles can help stave off dementia, perhaps by building a resilient 'cognitive reserve' in the aging brain.

    The study was based on the brain autopsies on 586 people who lived to an average of almost 91. Researchers compared each person's lifestyle and end-of-life mental skills to their neurological signs of dementia, such as brain protein plaques or chang...

    Exercise is crucial to recovering from a stroke, helping victims regain lost physical and mental function.

    And stroke survivors are more likely to remain physically active -- or even exercise more than before -- if they have access to a neighborhood rec center or gym, a new study finds.

    The odds of a patient being more active in recovery than before their stroke was 57% higher among...

    Losing the use of an arm after a stroke can be devastating, but new research could offer survivors fresh hope.

    The study found that a combination of targeted brain stimulation therapy, along with intense physical rehabilitation, can restore control of an affected arm or hand.

    “This is the first time that brain stimulation combined with rehabilitation therapy for stroke is availabl...

    Even small increases in a man's cardio fitness can significantly reduce his risk of developing prostate cancer, researchers report.

    An annual increase in aerobic fitness of 3% or more is linked to a 35% lower risk of prostate cancer, according to a report published Jan. 30 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

    “Improvements in [cardiorespiratory fitness] in adult men...

    Your office chair could be a killer.

    New research shows that folks who spent most of their workday sitting were 16% more prone to an early death, compared to folks in non-sitting jobs.

    The Taiwanese study did offer workers a glimmer of hope, however: Getting up & moving a bit during the workday or adding a bit of leisure-time exercise greatly reduced the risk.

    The research...

    Folks who drop pounds to help control their diabetes receive other substantial heath benefits for all their efforts, a new study says.

    Substantial weight loss that led to even a short-lived remission in type 2 diabetes also prompted a 40% lower rate in heart disease and a 33% lower rate of kidney disease, researchers report in the Jan. 18 issue of the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 19, 2024
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  • Getting bored with your treadmill or exercise bike?

    Picking up a couple dumbbells instead of lacing up your running shoes once in a while won't do your heart any harm, a new study reports.

    Splitting the recommended amount of physical activity between aerobic and resistance exercises reduces the risk of heart disease just as well as an aerobic-only workout regimen, researchers found....

    Using two feet or two wheels to get back and forth to work each day could reduce the inflammation that leads to cancer, heart disease and diabetes, new research shows.

    So-called "active commuting" -- walking or biking to work -- for at least 45 minutes daily lowered levels of a blood marker for inflammation called C-reactive protein (CRP), Finnish researchers report.

    That was true e...

    Putting a little pressure on your bones during exercise or daily activities might pay off in stronger bones as you age, new research suggests.

    The study focused on a crucial part of the hip joint anatomy called the femoral neck.

    Finnish researchers found that largely sedentary folks ages 70 to 85 maintained or gained bone strength in the femoral neck after a year-long exercise progr...

    TUESDAY, Jan. 16, 2024 (HeathDay News) -- Folks often feel more alert and savvy after a great workout, and dopamine might be the reason why.

    A small, new study by British and Japanese researchers found higher levels of the "feel good" brain neurotransmitter were released by men during exercise.

    In turn, that seemed tied to better performance on thinking tests, the researchers said.<...

    Employees at many companies are urged to take advantage of free wellness programs focused on mindfulness, life coaching, better sleep and many other issues.

    Too bad most won't actually boost their well-being, a new study of over 46,000 British workers finds.

    Only one of the 90 different workplace wellness offerings appeared to boost well-being: Getting employees involved in charity ...

    Snowstorms are blanketing the United States, prompting countless Americans to pick up snow shovels and clear walkways and driveways.

    Shoveling snow is more than a chore, however -- it can be a health hazard.

    The exertion of shoveling snow increases a person's risk of heart attack or sudden cardiac arrest, warns the American Heart Association.

    Snow shoveling has a prominent pla...

    Using marijuana can help folks better enjoy a good workout, but it's not going to boost their athletic performance, a new study has found.

    A small group of runners reported greater enjoyment and a more intense “runner's high” when they exercised after using marijuana, according to new findings published recently in the journal

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 8, 2024
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  • Is that New Year's resolution to improve your fitness already looking less likely?

    It can be tough to know where to start, said Benedikte Western, a research fellow at the University of Agder in Norway.

    “It takes time to develop new habits, but if you're motivated, it is certainly not impossible,” Western said in a univers...

    Combining mindfulness with exercise could be the key to managing stress during a potentially turbulent 2024, a new review argues.

    People who exercise and practice mindfulness meditation together tend to have less worry, stress, anxiety and depression than those who only engage in either activity, according to results from 35 studies involving more than 2,200 people.

    Mindfulness medi...

    Still weighing whether to make a New Year's resolution? Or perhaps regretting letting your healthy habits slide during the holidays?

    Either way, the American Medical Association (AMA) has ten recommendations to help Americans improve their health in 2024.

    “It is quite common after the holidays to think about all you've eaten or your reduced physical activity and get discouraged,�...

    Women are more likely to lose more muscle mass during space flight than men, a new lab study suggests.

    Females participating in the extended bed rest study lost more leg muscle mass at two months than the men had lost at three months, results show.

    The findings “suggest that women are more susceptible to weightlessness-induced muscle atrophy,” researchers concluded in their repo...

    Elite athletes who suffer a sudden cardiac arrest might have genetics that make them more vulnerable to heart disease, a new study suggests.

    Analysis of more than 280 top-level endurance athletes revealed that 1 in 6 have measures that would normally suggest heart disease and reduced heart function, researchers report in the journal Circulation.

    Those athletes also carried ...

    Hours plunked down in front of the TV or staring at a phone screen in childhood could bring poor heart health decades later, a new study shows.

    Finnish researchers say kids who were largely sedentary tended to turn into young adults who battled high cholesterol and other health troubles.

    “Our study shows increased sedentary time in childhood may contribute to two-thirds of the tot...

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