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Results for search "Sports Medicine".

12 Jul

Pickleball Injuries Are on the Rise. Why Are So Many Players Ignoring the Pain?

In a new Harris Poll, nearly 50% of people say it’s not worth seeing a doctor for a sports injury they think will probably heal on its own.

Health News Results - 177

The repeat head injuries suffered by football players, boxers and other athletes appear to affect brain health long after players have given up their sport.

New research from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore could explain why: The persistence in the brain of inflammation tied to the original injury or injuries.

“The findings show that participating in repeated collision spor...

Playing professional football, especially if you are a lineman, may shorten your life, a new study suggests.

The University of Minnesota researchers thought that perhaps professional football players are unlike “American men in general” in ways that determine their future health.

“When we started digging into the literature on later life health outcomes for professional Americ...

Use of steroids among high school athletes is a continuing problem, and now new research finds these youths are also more likely to suffer a concussion while they play.

The study was published Oct. 20 in the Journal of Osteopathic ...

Kids who get discouraged by idealized athletic bodies on social media may end up dropping out of sports, a small study suggests.

In a preliminary study of 70 kids who played -- or used to play -- sports, researchers found that some had quit because they thought they didn't have the "right" body for the activity. And most got that idea from media images, including TikTok and Instagram post...

Pickleball has become wildly popular, but that may be fueling a rise in pickleball-related injuries.

“It's quickly becoming a sport of choice for adults over the age of 50,” said Dr. Brian Cole, an orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. He also plays pi...

Treating shoulder pain with steroid shots or removal of cartilage buildup yields the same result as no treatment at all, a Norwegian research team reports.

They said their findings call into question treatment guidelines for calcific tendinopathy, a painful condition in the shoulder's rotator cuff tendons.

Researchers said the common invasive procedure, known as ult...

Former pro football players with symptoms of depression or anxiety are far more likely to receive an unverifiable diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) than players without those mental health conditions, a new study reports.

Players with depression are 9.5 times more likely to be diagnosed with CTE, while players with both depression and anxiety are 12 times more likely, th...

Playing sports can offer a lot of benefits for kids, but it's also important to help protect them from injuries.

Parents and coaches can make a big difference in helping kids play safely, according to Nemours Kids Health.

The medical organization suggests starting with proper equipment. Use it, but also make sure the safety gear is the right size, fits well and is right for the sp...

If mountain biking is your exercise of choice, go for it.

A new study finds that the benefits of this sport outweigh the risks, dashing a common view that it's always dangerous, injury-inducing and meant for thrill seekers.

“Mountain biking and hiking a...

The degenerative brain disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) may be striking some at much younger ages than thought possible: New research has uncovered early signs of the condition in amateur athletes who died young after playing contact sports.

The troubling finding was discovered during the brain autopsies of 152 athletes. All had engaged in the type of sports, such a...

The link between pro football and the risk for a neurodegenerative disease called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is well known, and now a new study suggests that football may also up the risk for Parkinson's disease, even among past high school and college players.

“Parkinson's disease has been commonly reported in boxers, but we have not explored this link in great detail in fo...

Competitive sports can be a lot of fun for kids and teens, but starting a new season requires some planning.

Nemours TeensHealth offers some suggestions for kids and teens who are taking up a new sport or beginning a new season.

  • Start by getting into shape. That will make it easier when you begin your sport.

You can do this by writing down an e...

Pickleball is a hot trend and it's getting folks exercising who haven't been so active in a long time.

It's also racking up injuries — both overuse type and acute traumas — often in those aged 50 and up.

A new poll suggests these players are forgoing care when they hurt their knees, wrists and rotator cuffs. Sports medicine experts are urging them not to ignore their nagging pai...

Heather Anderson, a star Australian rules football player who died last November, is the first female professional athlete to be diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE.

"She is the first female athlete diagnosed with CTE, but she will not be the last," researchers wrote in a paper published Friday. Anderson was 28 when she died from what was believed to be suicide.
<...

Pickleball has burst onto the scene, inspiring people of all ages to pick up a paddle.

But as with any sport, it's possible to get hurt. Some best practices can help prevent injuries, according to a sports medicine expert.

For pickleball players, the most common injury is to the rotator cuff tendon in the shoulder.

This can cause shoulder pain, especially with movement and use...

Autopsy is currently the only way to definitively diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a degenerative brain disease often seen in athletes who've suffered repeated blows to the head.

But there may be a way to predict which athletes are likely to develop CTE, researchers report June 28 in the journal Neurology.

They outline criteria for a condition called traumat...

After a focus on her own mental health and that of other athletes, U.S. gymnast Simone Biles will return to elite competition.

Biles will begin with the Aug. 5 U.S. Classic outside of Chicago, the Associated Press reported. She has not competed since the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, held in 2021, where she removed herself from sever...

Athletes using ketone supplements to boost their performance may be kidding themselves, researchers say.

The literature on the benefit of ketone supplements is mixed. Some studies have shown the supplements improve performance, but others say they have no effect or even worsen performance.

Natural ketones fuel the brain and muscles. A ketogenic diet of very low carbs and high fat c...

The number and strength of head impacts, not concussions, cause degenerative brain injuries to football players, a new study suggests.

That's what appears to drive the growing number of cases of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), researchers say.

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive and fatal brain disease associated with repeated traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). I...

A traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have long-term effects, much like a chronic condition, a new study says.

Looking at hundreds of patients, researchers found that problems related to traumatic brain injuries can last for years, with people improving and declining at different time points. These problems encompassed memory, thinking and everyday functioning.

"TBI is essentially a ...

A pro football career can mean chronic pain after retirement, but Black players are especially hard-hit, a new study finds.

The study, of nearly 4,000 former National Football League (NFL) players, found that Black men reported more intense, more debilitating pain than their white counterparts. They were also more likely to suffer from depression, anxiety or fatigue -- and those problems ...

Limited "heading" of a soccer ball in youth sports may not cause irreversible harm, as long as players are properly trained, a new study finds.

This study from concussion researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) looked at the consequences of repeated head impacts shortly after the impact. They did this using six different tests.

They found that having a small ...

A new brain bank is accepting future donations from living athletes, in an effort to perform long-term research into the effects of sports-related concussion.

The National Sports Brain Bank (NSBB) at the University of Pittsburgh will track the health of living participants on an annual basis, and...

Lured by promises of bigger muscles and better performance on the field, many athletes and bodybuilders turn to anabolic steroids despite their well-known side effects, including increased risk for heart disease and mood issues.

Now, two new studies show these harms may persist after athletes stop taking the synthetic hormones.

The message is clear when it comes to the illegal ...

Fighting is par for the course in professional ice hockey, but a new study raises the question of whether it is shortening some players' lives.

The study, of hundreds of National Hockey League (NHL) players, found that those who were "enforcers" on the ice — that is, did a lot of fighting ...

A study of triathletes reveals certain body types perform better in certain climates.

Taller, leaner runners with long limbs tend to excel in Ironman endurance events held in warm climates, whereas marathoners with stockier builds and shorter limbs perform better in colder climates, a Dartmouth College researcher says.

Endurance athletes may want to consider competing in climates t...

Chronic tendon issues are a frequent source of pain and can limit activity. They become more common with age, weight and certain activities, and early and appropriate diagnosis by a doctor is critical to get the best outcomes.

The Achilles tendon is the biggest tendon in the human body. It connects the calf to the foot, and it is responsible for push-off power. The tendon is critical for ...

Could golfing be good medicine for arthritis?

Yes, according to researchers who found that for people with osteoarthritis, golfing lowered psychological distress and improved general health when compared with the general population.

"Golf is a health-enhancing source of physical activity, particularly for older adults," said lead researcher

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • April 26, 2023
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  • Need to get your shut-eye on time? What you eat could make a difference, according to a new study.

    Researchers found that college athletes who ate more carbohydrates and vitamins B12 and C tended to go to sleep and wake up earlier.

    It's possible that these nutrients might increase synthesis of vital hormones that regulate sleep, including serotonin and melatonin, the authors said.

    A good sports bra provides more than sturdy support alone for female runners.

    The increased breast support affects biomechanics in other parts of the body -- and, a new study shows, the right sports bra could actually boost a woman's running performance by 7%.

    “Our study represents one of a series of research studies on the topic of breast support and whole body biomechanics,” s...

    Spring brings with it the joy of baseball, but too much of a good thing can lead to elbow injuries in young pitchers.

    An expert from UT Southwestern in Dallas offers some tips for youth baseball players, their parents and coaches about avoiding and being aware of injuries, including tears or ruptures of the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL).

    “Athletes 18 and younger should not pitch...

    Returning to golf, tennis or pickleball after shoulder replacement surgery shouldn't be too hard.

    Healing does take time, but within a few months most people can get back to play at their pre-surgery level without the pain that they experienced before, a pair of new studies show.

    "Recovery after both an anatomic and reverse shoulder replacement or from any shoulder replacement is id...

    Fewer high school athletes are getting hurt playing sports, but those who do are more likely to suffer severe injuries that require surgery or a timeout from their chosen sport, new research shows.

    Which teens are most at risk? Those who participate in football, girls' soccer and boys' wrestling, the study authors found. Knee and ankle sprains and strains, along with head injuries such as...

    New research offers hope to elite athletes who have genetic heart conditions but still want to play sports.

    In the new study, after a follow-up of seven years, researchers found that 95% of athletes with a diagnosed and treated genetic heart disease had no disease-triggered cardiac events. These would have included fainting or seizures, implantable cardio-defibrillator (ICD) shocks, sudde...

    Playing sports can be good for kids of all abilities.

    A leading medical organization offers some tips for getting children involved, while helping keep them safe and injury-free.

    “We encourage children to play a variety of sports, both to increase their enjoyment over time and to avoid injuries we often see with overuse,” said

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • March 4, 2023
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  • Spring sports season will be here soon, so it's time to get kids ready after a winter break.

    Sports can teach valuable lessons, including teamwork, good sportsmanship, good communication, preparing for success, handling a loss, time management and the importance of doing your best, according to Henry Ford Health System in Detroit.

    Pediatrician

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • February 19, 2023
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  • Buffalo Bills safety Damar Hamlin is issuing a CPR challenge to promote use of the emergency procedure that saved his life on national television.

    Hamlin, 24, suffered cardiac arrest during a Jan. 2 game against the Cincinnati Bengals, moments after being tackled hard in the chest.

    A mo...

    The saga of Damar Hamlin's recent collapse during a football game has thrown the dangers of sports-related cardiac arrest into the spotlight.

    What about this happening to someone much older?

    A new study brings reassuring news: It's rare for an older adult to have a sudden cardiac arrest during exercise, and those who do tend to have fewer health issues than those who experience ...

    “Move it or lose it” the saying goes, but too much exercise or playing sports can lead to overuse injuries.

    These injuries include damage to bones, ligaments, tendons and muscles due to repetitive actions, such running, throwing, biking, lifting and swimming, to name a few.

    An overuse injury can be the result of poor training techniques such as doing too much too fast; not warm...

    It's no secret that athletic endurance and strength go hand-in-hand with a healthy heart.

    “Exercise strengthens the heart muscle, enabling it to pump a greater volume of blood with each heartbeat,” said Dr. Deepak ...

    Some college athletes take longer to recover from a concussion, but a new study offers them some good news.

    They may still be able to return to play -- after one extra month of recovery, researchers report Jan. 18 in the journal Neurology.

    "Although an athlete may experience a slow or delayed recovery, there is reason to believe recovery is achievable with additional time ...

    Buffalo Bills safety Damar Hamlin has been released from a Buffalo hospital just nine days after he suffered cardiac arrest during a Monday night football game.

    "Damar Hamlin has been discharged from Buffalo General Medical Center/Gates Vascular Institute," the Buffalo Bills team announced on

  • Robin Foster HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 11, 2023
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  • Buffalo Bills safety Damar Hamlin is now back in New York.

    The football player who collapsed on the field after suffering cardiac arrest during a Monday night game in Cincinnati has been released from an Ohio hospital, and will continue his recovery in a Buffalo hospital, the Buffalo Bills football team posted on

    An antidote to teenage depression might be found in school gymnasiums and on sports fields, a major new review argues.

    Supervised exercise programs are associated with significant reductions in symptoms of depression among children and teenagers, according to the analysis of data from 21 studies involving more than 2,400 kids.

    “This is the first time that we've been able to put en...

    While NFL safety Damar Hamlin is still critically ill after suffering cardiac arrest during a game on Monday, he is making a "fairly remarkable recovery," his doctors said during a news conference on Thursday.

    “There has been substantial improvement in his condition over the past 24 hours,”

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • January 6, 2023
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  • Damar Hamlin, the Buffalo Bills player who collapsed Monday after suffering cardiac arrest during a game, is showing “signs of improvement,” his team said Wednesday.

    Still, the 24-year-old "is expected to remain under intensive care as his health care team continues to monitor and treat him,” the Buffalo Bills

    Buffalo Bills safety Damar Hamlin threw himself into the path of a Cincinnati Bengals ball carrier, taking a hard hit to the chest that sent both NFL players to the ground.

    Hamlin, 24, stood to dust himself off, took two steps — and then fell flat on his back, limp and unresponsive.

    Hamlin suffered a cardiac arrest following the tough tackle in Monday night's game, officials now s...

    Skiiers and snowboarders, take note: You're less likely to get hurt if you ease back into the winter sports season.

    “We see a lot of patients in the After-Hours Clinic (of the department of orthopaedic surgery) on their way back from skiing and snowboarding,” said Dr. Sabrina Sawl...

    Former elite football players may age faster than their more average peers, a new study suggests.

    NFL players, especially former linemen, had fewer disease-free years and earlier high blood pressure and diabetes diagnoses. Two age-related diseases, arthritis and dementia, were also more commonly found in former football players than in other men of the same age.

    This research was p...

    Olympic athletes aren't like the rest of the population -- but this time it's in a far less positive way.

    Two new studies show that athletes who performed at the top of their sport have a higher risk of developing arthritis and joint pain in later life. The linked studies found that 1 in 4 former Olympians dealt with these issues.

    Those who'd been injured during their sporting caree...

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