**Please be advised that due to a fire next door on January 2nd, the pharmacy has TEMPORARILY moved to:
155 SE 2nd Main St Hillsboro, OR 97123
Thank you for your patience!**

Now offering Flu Shot and Covid-19 Vaccines (Moderna Bivalent and Pfizer Bivalent). Walk-ins available!
We also offer "Monoclonal Antibodies" treatment for patients with Covid-19.
Hillsboro Pharmacy Logo

Get Healthy!

Results for search "Research &, Development".

Health News Results - 425

It's thought that for an HIV vaccine to be widely effective, it will have to spur the body to make special antibodies that can neutralize a broad range of HIV strains. Now scientists say they have taken an essential step in that direction.

In an early study, researchers found that an experimental HIV va...

The experimental Alzheimer's drug lecanemab slowed thinking declines among patients suffering the early stages of the disease in a new study, but safety concerns about brain swelling and brain bleeds remain.

In the eagerly awaited trial findings, published Tuesday in the New England...

The breast cancer of author and poet Stephanie Gangi has receded and advanced in wearying waves for two decades now.

First diagnosed and treated in 1999, Gangi’s cancer spread to the bone of her sternum in 2014. In 2021, a tumor the size of an orange appeared on her adrenal gland.

“I could not possibly tell you the number of treatments I’ve been through,” said Gangi, 66, of ...

A new malaria antibody treatment may keep more people free of the sometimes deadly disease for up to six months in regions where infection rates are high.

Instead of requiring the immune system to make enough antibodies, this experimental drug provides those who receive it with a large amount of lab-made antibodies. It requires an infusion via IV, but a shot version of the drug is in ear...

In what could be an advance against hair loss, researchers say they've successfully grown hair follicles in culture in the lab.

The Japanese research team created a system that produces fully mature hair follicles — the tube-like structure in which the root and strand of a hair grow — as well as hair as l...

The U.S. National Institutes of Health is investigating COVID experiments at Boston University that have sparked a media firestorm, with some news outlets alleging that scientists created a "killer" strain of the coronavirus as part of their research.

Boston University is refuting those news accounts, calling them a "false and inaccurate" interpretation of its research.

"They've sen...

Scientists have taught a brain cell culture living in a laboratory dish to play the vintage table-tennis video game Pong.

It's the first demonstration that a collection of lab-grown brain cells can be taught to perform goal-directed tasks, the Australian researchers report.

They call the culture...

Human brain tissue has been successfully transplanted into the brains of rats using a cutting-edge experimental procedure, say researchers. They envision the achievement as a promising new frontier in medical research.

Groups of living human nerve cells have become integrated into the brains of laboratory rats, creating hybrid brain circuits that can be activated through input from the ra...

A leading medical journal, the British Journal of Sports Medicine, has retracted nine more articles written by its former editor-in-chief and applied “expressions of concern” on 38 additional articles on which he is the sole author that were published in BMJ journals.

This is the latest development in the investigation, which concerns possible plagiarism and misrep...

Swedish scientist Svante Paabo received the Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday.

The 67-year-old researcher made important discoveries about human evolution and the immune system while comparing modern humans and early hominins. After developing new techniques, Paabo and his team made it possible to compa...

President Joe Biden made a renewed push for his cancer moonshot initiative on Monday.

Speaking at the famed John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston, Biden likened JFK's space race to his own effort to slash cancer rates by 50% in the next 25 years.

“He established a national purpose that cou...

A single blood test that can screen for more than 50 cancers seems to work fairly well in the real world, a preliminary study reveals.

Researchers found that of over 6,600 apparently healthy people aged 50 and older, the blood test detected a possible cancer "signal" in roughly 1%. When those individuals had more extensive testing, cancer was confirmed in 38%.

Experts called

An experimental drug that has been shown to treat rashes in people with lupus may also help with lupus-related joint pain.

Affecting as many as 1.5 million people in the United States, lupus is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system misfires against its own joints, skin, brain, lungs, kidneys and blood vesse...

In a finding that proves convenience is key when it comes to sticking to a medication regimen, new research shows that combining three heart drugs into one "polypill" slashes the risk of dying from a second heart attack by 33%.

"The results of the SECURE study show that for the first time that the polypill, wh...

Using only mouse stem cells, British researchers report they have created synthetic embryos that form a brain, a beating heart and other organs.

The stem cells organized themselves until they developed beating hearts and the foundations of the brain and yolk sacs where the embryo...

An experimental antibody therapy for multiple sclerosis can cut symptom flare-ups by half, versus a standard treatment, a new clinical trial has found.

The drug, called ublituximab, beat a standard oral medication for

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • August 25, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • A person's unrelated lookalike, commonly known as a doppelganger, may actually share genes that affect not only how they appear, but also their behavior.

    In a new study, scientists did DNA analysis on 32 sets of virtual twins — people with strong facial similarities — and found they possessed similar genetic variants.

    “Our study provides a rare insight into human likeness by...

    If you think hallucinogens like LSD are a thing of the past, think again.

    New research estimates that the use of mind-altering LSD rose from less than 1% in 2002 to 4% in 2019 among people aged 18 to 25. And, overall, 5.5 million Americans used some kind of hallucinogen in 2019.

    "According to our results, hallucin...

    Strike up the band!

    A new study finds that the aerosols produced by wind instruments like trombones and flutes are no more concerning than those given off during normal speech and breathing.

    For the study, University of Pennsylvania researchers worked with the Philadelphia Orchestra to better understand how much

  • By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • August 17, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Minutes after a heartbeat stops, a massive series of disastrous events triggered by lack of blood flow begins to destroy a body's cells and organs.

    This chain of events had been thought to be inevitable and irreversible. Now, a new animal study shows that

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • August 3, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • The future of ultrasound imaging could be a sticker affixed to the skin that can transmit images continuously for 48 hours.

    Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have created a postage stamp-sized device that creates live, high-resolution images. They reported on their progress this week.

    ...

    A drug in development as a cancer therapy may also help the body regenerate damaged nerves after spinal injuries, new research suggests.

    Scientists at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom report that they used cell and animal models to show that the drug, dubbed

  • By Ellie Quinlan Houghtaling HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • July 18, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Hinting at a future alternative to opioid painkillers, scientists have developed a tiny implant designed to ease post-surgery pain and then dissolve once the job is done.

    So far, the research has been limited to lab animals, and it will be several years before the technology could be ready for human testing....

    When breast cancer patients sleep, tumor cells may "awaken" and spread through the bloodstream, a surprising study out of Switzerland reveals.

    Circulating cancer cells that later form new growths (metastases) do not arise continuously as previously assumed, according to researchers at ETH Zurich, the University Hospital Basel and the University of Basel.

    "When the affected person is...

    An experimental Alzheimer's drug called crenezumab did not prevent or slow mental decline in patients with a genetic mutation that greatly raises the risk of developing the disease, the results of a decade-long clinical trial show.

    The mutation seen in the few hundred study participants from an extended famil...

    Cancer clinical trials in the United States appear to be rebounding after a significant slowdown during the pandemic, researchers say.

    For the study, the investigators analyzed data from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston and the Tisch Cancer Institute at Mount Sinai Medical School in New Y...

    An experimental drug for the neurological disorder ALS was approved in Canada on Monday, but an ongoing evaluation of the treatment by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has raised questions about its effectiveness.

    A condition of Hea...

    In what could turn out to be a potential breakthrough in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, a new report suggests a key component of a patient's immune system can be rewired to assassinate tumor cells.

    The experimental approach has already shown promise in one patient.

    Kathy Wilkes, 71, had been stru...

    A genetically engineered tomato could one day rival salmon as a dietary source of vitamin D, if early research pans out.

    British scientists used gene "editing" to produce the tomato, which is chock full of provitamin D3, a precursor that the body can convert into vitamin D.

    The gene twe...

    With the United States facing an epidemic of drug overdoses, researchers are developing a wearable patch that can detect an oncoming opioid OD and deliver doses of a drug that could save lives.

    The Indiana University Bloomington research team has received a three-year, $3.8 million grant from the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse to develop the patch, which combines two separate cutti...

    Dogs' ultra-sensitive noses can detect illegal drugs and even cancer, and a new study suggests they may also be able to sniff out COVID-19 in airline passengers.

    Not only that, these trained canines can do so with an accuracy comparable to a PCR nose and throat swab test, the researchers noted.

    "Our preliminary observations suggest that dogs primed with one virus type can in a few h...

    An international research effort has unveiled the most extensive reference map yet of individual cells within the human body, knowledge that could revolutionize the study of health and disease.

    The massive Human Cell Atlas contains detailed maps of more than one million individual cells across 33 organs and systems, researchers announced this week.

    "You can think of it as a Google M...

    Does science sell? Sometimes.

    Using science to sell chocolate chip cookies and other yummy products is likely to backfire, a new study shows, but touting scientific research behind more practical, everyday items -- such as body wash -- can be an effective marketing strategy.

    "People see science as cold, but competent. That doesn't pair well with products designed to be warm and plea...

    An experimental COVID-19 vaccine in pill form could be a win-win, as it not only protects against infection but also limits the airborne spread of the virus, tests in lab animals show.

    The current vaccines reduce the risk of serious COVID-19 illness and hospitalization but aren't foolproof armor against infection with

    The most common treatments for sleep apnea are mechanical -- CPAP machines, mouthguards and the like.

    But researchers think they've found a drug that might ease sleep apnea in some.

    The drug sulthiame, normally used to treat epilepsy, appeared to reduce breathing pauses by more than 20 events an hour, on average, in

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • April 20, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • A mesh plug normally used to treat one type of brain aneurysm is also effective when dealing with another type, a new study says.

    Aneurysms are bulges in blood vessels that can cause a life-threatening rupture. They typically occur where a blood vessel forks into two branches (bifurcates), but can also occur on the side of a blood vessel.

    The study found that a device called a Woven...

    A brighter future could be in store for people with a spinal cord injury if new animal research pans out in humans.

    Mice that were paralyzed due to severe spinal cord damage regained the ability to walk within four weeks of receiving an experimental injectable therapy, say researchers led by Samuel Stupp of Northwestern University in Chicago.

    The research team plans to seek U.S...

    In their search for a drug to prevent Alzheimer's disease, scientists are taking a look at certain rheumatoid arthritis drugs.

    Preliminary findings suggest that a type of rheumatoid arthritis drug known as TNF inhibitors may lower dementia risk in rheumatoid arthritis patients who also suffer from heart disease.

    But no one is suggesting these drugs be prescribed broadly to stave of...

    President Joe Biden on Tuesday ordered a new national push to research the nature and impact of long COVID, a constellation of sometimes debilitating symptoms that linger long after infection in nearly one-third of Americans.

    The research initiative will be...

    The Human Genome Project produced the most complete map of human genetics ever assembled in 2003 - but that map still held many uncharted territories.

    It did not contain about 8% of the human genome, representing crucial regions and large gaps that have remained hidden from scientists.

    Now, an ambitious team of researchers has gone back and filled those empty spaces, assembling the ...

    In a close vote, an advisory panel for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration decided not to recommend the approval of an experimental drug for the deadly neurological disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    The panel's decision had been closely watched, with patient advocacy groups lobbying hard for fast-...

    Despite months of intense lobbying by patient advocates, federal health officials on Monday posted a largely negative review of an experimental drug for the devastating illness known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    In an analysis of Amylyx Pharmaceuticals' drug, known for now only as

  • Dennis Thompson and Robin Foster
  • |
  • March 29, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page
  • Most brain studies that rely on MRI scans don't include enough people to provide trustworthy results, researchers say.

    These brain-wide association studies use MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) to see how brain structure and function connect with personality, behavior, thinking, neurological conditions ...

    A woman with HIV who received an umbilical cord blood transplant has become the third person in the world to be cured of the virus that causes AIDS.

    The two others, both men, were cured after receiving bone marrow transplants from donors who carried a mutation that blocks HIV, The New York Times reported.

    The woman -- who is of mixed race -- was diagnosed with HIV in 2013 a...

    A new lung cancer drug that has only been tested in China was soundly rejected by an advisory panel to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday.

    Known as sintilimab, the treatment is a type of immunotherapy that unleashes the immune system to attack tumors. It was developed and tested in China by Innovent Biologics, which entered into an agreement with Eli Lilly that...

    President Joe Biden announced Wednesday that he is giving a new push to the cancer moonshot initiative that he first led during the Obama administration.

    In his announcement, Biden said the program would aim to boost prevention, screening and research with a target of reducing the cancer death rate by 50% over the ne...

    COVID-19 vaccines activate long-lasting immune system T-cells that target coronavirus variants of concern, including Delta and Omicron, new research shows.

    The research team at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology in California studied adults who were fully ...

    A robot performed challenging keyhole surgery on pigs without any human help in what could be a major step toward fully automated surgery on people.

    "Our findings show that we can automate one of the most intricate and delicate tasks in surgery: the reconnection of two ends of an intestine," said senior study author Axel Krieger. He is an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at J...

    A one-two punch from science has clearly tagged the mononucleosis virus, Epstein-Barr, as a major cause of multiple sclerosis.

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) appears to trigger multiple sclerosis (MS) by tricking the immune systems of some into attacking their body's own nerve cells, a new study indicates.

    "...

    Belly fat is usually unwelcome, but new research suggests it may actually be good for something: relief from foot pain.

    A small pilot study suggests that an injection of a patient's own fat cells can help ease the often-excruciating heel pain brought on by a condition known as

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
  • |
  • January 26, 2022
  • |
  • Full Page